Probate Documents "Writ of Hire" of Frances A. and William A. Valentia, and Albert S. Killingsworth, Wards. Signed by Albert N. Ford, clerk, A.J. Scott, A.W. Sutpin, and Thomas S. Osteen, appraisers, J.M. Ellis, Judge. Slavery. Mississippi.
Probate Documents "Writ of Hire" of Frances A. and William A. Valentia, and Albert S. Killingsworth, Wards. Signed by Albert N. Ford, clerk, A.J. Scott, A.W. Sutpin, and Thomas S. Osteen, appraisers, J.M. Ellis, Judge
Probate Documents "Writ of Hire" of Frances A. and William A. Valentia, and Albert S. Killingsworth, Wards. Signed by Albert N. Ford, clerk, A.J. Scott, A.W. Sutpin, and Thomas S. Osteen, appraisers, J.M. Ellis, Judge
Mary Shaw, Guardian of the Orphaned Killingsworth Children -- Valuation of Negro Property --

Probate Documents "Writ of Hire" of Frances A. and William A. Valentia, and Albert S. Killingsworth, Wards. Signed by Albert N. Ford, clerk, A.J. Scott, A.W. Sutpin, and Thomas S. Osteen, appraisers, J.M. Ellis, Judge

Jefferson County, State of Mississippi, 1858. Item #714

4to. 315 x 200mm., [12 ½ x 8 inches].  2 pp. Docket on verso. Blue legal paper; folds, edges browned, and slightly frayed; top page cut 2 inches shorter, no loss.


The first page, dated July 27, 1858, shows the value of two slaves, Juda and Emma, owned by the named wards to be valued at $40 together. The three appraisers of the above slave property signed their names on the first page. The second page is an application of Mary Shaw, dated April 9, guardian of the four Killingsworth wards to appoint the appraisers for the slaves. It is signed by Albert N. Ford, clerk.


There is an interesting story behind these records. William Anderson Killingsworth, owner of about thirty slaves, was born 1821 in Tennessee. He married Nancy Ann Shaw who was born 1820 in Mississippi, and died 23 June 1853 in Jefferson County, MS. Their children were Francis, Horace, Valencia, William, and Albert.


On July 19, 1854 William Killingsworth was murdered by two of his slaves, named Jesse and Albert.  Two more slaves, Bill and Charles, were accused of torching the house. Unnamed slaves retrieved William's body and his three children from the burning house. The slaves' trial was in the fall of 1854. Jesse and Albert were hung November 21, 1854. Jesse confessed that he alone committed the murder. 


This information is recorded in a diary written by Susan Sillers Darden, which began in January 1854.  Darden was thirty-eight years old when she wrote the diary.  The diary reads in part;


“July 20, 1854: There was an awful murder committed at Killingsworth’s last night.  He was murdered by his negroes and the house burned down; he had four children but the house was discovered and taken out.”


“November 21, 1854:  Our negroes went to Fayette to see Jesse and Albert hung for murdering their master W. Killingsworth.  Jesse confessed that he had done it all, that no one helped to do it; exhorted his fellow servants to be faithful and do their duty.”


Since both parents were deceased, the Killingsworth children were the wards of their grandmother Mary Shaw and Uncle William Shaw. Frances Chalmers Killingsworth (1842-1910) was the oldest child.


 See The Diary of Susan Sillers Darden on-line at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Jackson Mississippi. 

.

Price: $450.00

See all items in African American
See all items by