An Account of the Convincement and the Call to the Ministry of Margaret Lucas, Late of Leek, In Staffordshire. Margaret Lucas.
An Account of the Convincement and the Call to the Ministry of Margaret Lucas, Late of Leek, In Staffordshire
An Account of the Convincement and the Call to the Ministry of Margaret Lucas, Late of Leek, In Staffordshire
WOMAN FACES FAMILY ABUSE TO CONVERT TO QUAKERISM

An Account of the Convincement and the Call to the Ministry of Margaret Lucas, Late of Leek, In Staffordshire

Stanford (New York): Printed by Daniel Lawrence for Henry and John F. Hull, 1803. Item #553

12mo. 160 x 100mm. [6 1/2 x 4 inches]. vi, [7]-111, plus 1 p. ads. Contemporary calf binding. Head of spine chipped with a crack along front hinge but sound. Some pages lightly foxed. 


 First American edition, originally published by Darton & Harvey in 1797.  Margaret Lucas (b. 1701), was the owner of a china shop in London, inherited from her father who died in 1708.  In her Account she recounts her conversion to the Quakerism, which she did against the will of her aunt and uncle, who also had an interest in the shop.  Their response to her conversion resulted in physical and emotional abuse in their attempt to dissuade her, including pinching, throwing a brass candlestick at her and using a whip.  Her book had two goals.  First, to characterize the practices of Quakerism and demonstrate the strength of those who adhered to its tenants.  Secondly, to illustrate to the public the nature of the persecution experienced by Quakers in the practice of their faith. 


 At the time, Quakerism was considered radical for allowing women to participate and speak in worship and for asking them to prioritize their relationship with God over earthly relationships, including those with men in positions of power.  


 The book was printed by Daniel Lawrence, a Quaker practicing his faith in Stanford, New York.  It contains one page of advertisements of books for sale by Henry and John F. Hull at back of volume. The list includes several other published Quaker journals by women including Sarah Grubb, Catharine Philip, Mary Neale and Patience Brayton. Daniel Lawrence became a Quaker in 1788 and printed material for the Hull brothers between 1802 and 1805.  


 Brown, Sylvia (ed.). Women, Gender and Radical Religion in Early Modern Europe. 2007, pp. 100 - 103 pp.  Bradley, “Daniel Lawrence, Quaker Printer of Burlington, Philadelphia, and Stanford, N.Y.”  Quaker History, Volume 65, Number 2, Autumn 1976, 100-102 pp.   

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Price: $200.00

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